Recent Posts in Bighorn River Ecosystem Category

  • Effective ways to fish in the grass on the Bighorn River.

    As late August arrives the days start to get noticeably shorter and the nights a little cooler. The hot summer days yield to cool summer nights and as the air conditioners slow down the fishing picks up. The changing of the seasons does something else that is relatively unpleasant on the Bighorn River. It causes the long shoots of grass growing on the river bottom to cut loose and float to the ...
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  • An interview with FWP Bighorn River Biologist Mike Ruggles on the Big Trout in the Bighorn River

    The water clarity this spring is incredible and the fishing is “on” the hook! The water seems to be back to normal on the Bighorn River and the trout are eating well. With the water being so clear it’s incredible to see all the different types of fish in the Bighorn River. Walleye, northern pike, crappie, small mouth bass, thousands of carp, and of course trout can be seen swimming around in the ...
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  • Big Trout are back in The Bighorn River

    The Montana section of the Bighorn River begins in Fort Smith and ends when it meets the Yellowstone River in Custer, Montana. The Bighorn River is a tail water that flows from the Yellowtaill reservoir. The Yellowtail reservoir is a 72 mile long lake that stretches back into Wyoming. The reservoir is a flooded canyon more than 300 feet deep and harbors incredible fish populations. The crystal ...
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  • The truth behind the Emerald Shiner Minnow on the Bighorn River

    The truth behind the Emerald Shiner Minnow on the Bighorn River This spring a LARGE number of shiner minnows have been flushed over the dam from the Bighorn Reservoir and ended up in the popular trout water of the Bighorn River. They have changed the fishing, adding a new dynamic to how we catch trout on this incredibly famous section of the river. The river boasts between 5000 and 7000 trout per ...
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  • Fish an Orange Scud Bud!

    Scuds are another name for freshwater shrimp. Scuds have a flattened segmented body, 14 pairs of legs, antennae and a tail. There are more than 150 types of freshwater scuds in North America and the most common scuds in tail waters come from the family Gammaridae. Some can grow as large as an inch, but most are barely half that size. Scuds thrive in cool, well-oxygenated water with small amounts ...
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  • Species Profile: The Rainbow Trout

    The rainbow trout is one of the most popular and common species of fish found in the streams and lakes of Montana, and is the most popular gamefish in the state. On this blog, we look at some of the characteristics and habits of this particular breed in order to help you better prepare to wrangle them in on your next fishing trip with us at Forrester’s Bighorn River Resort. Appearance The rainbow ...
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  • Brown Trout of the Bighorn River

    The brown trout was introduced to North America in 1883 but originated in Europe and western Asia. It was introduced to Montana in 1889 and is now found throughout most of the state. They swim throughout the wild rivers of Montana. They prefer larger, low gradient streams, where temperatures range from 55 to 65 degrees in the summer months, but they also do well in many reservoirs. Unlike rainbow ...
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